If a large branch falls in the woods and there is no one around to hear it, does it make a sound?  If I empty the dishwasher and there is no one in the house to recognize my significant contribution to the stability of the home, does it count?  Yes, my contributions count and the branch does make a sound.  The significance is in the events and not whether or not there was an audience.

If you as a worker in the animal care industry find that you are making significant contributions but are unsure if anyone hears or cares, I’d like you to know that we do care and we want to hear.

We want to hear your story, what brought you to such a noble profession, what made you stay when things around you made you feel less than secure, and what made you decide to be world famous at what you do.

Through the trainings that we offer we have the fortunate opportunity to hear people’s stories.  And I must admit they are humbling and amazing and funny and we want to hear more.  Just recently I spoke with a woman who was a chauffeur prior to coming into our industry. Another gentleman was a chef looking for something different. There’s also the story of the son who got into the industry because it was part of the family legacy.  I believe people want to share their stories because it makes them more real. I believe we need to hear each other’s stories because it makes us more real and in doing so we care a little more.

I recently met with a lab animal group that had come under some significant pressure from animal rights extremists.  Just asking them why they stayed at their job blew me away.   Here are some of their replies: “Because I didn’t want to stop caring for the animals” … “the people protesting what I do still deserve the benefits of our research” and … “the people that I work with care about me and we need each other”.  What great testimonies of commitment to purpose.

These are the stories we need to hear. These are stories that make us real to each other and spur us on to continue pursuits of excellence and dedication for the noble thing we do.

There will be branches in the woods that fall and no one hears, and there will be times you make significant contributions to the world around you with no audience.  May this be of one of many forms of encouragement to keep doing what you do, keep creating chapters to your story. It still matters!  And some day maybe you will have the chance to share your story with others.

One of the great things about doing something over and over is that the more you do it the less you have to think about doing it.  It becomes automatic, almost natural.  A habit is defined as an acquired pattern of behavior that often occurs automatically.  We sometimes form habits without any intention, yet there are other times when we develop habits out of intention and necessity.

It’s just as easy to form a bad habit as it is to form a good habit.  It is often said that doing something at least 21 times solidifies a habit.  Whether that is true in every case is up for debate.  The reality, however, is that the more you do something, the more likely you will repeat it.  If you’re going to be consistent at something makes sure it’s something that is going to move you into your desired direction.

As we move into another year and think about how we want to make adjustments and improvements in our lives either at home or at work, creating good habits to sustain improvements is essential.

Here are a few tips that may help you if you are looking to create good habits in the New Year.

  1. Write it down – What do you want to achieve?  Write it, post it, type it and keep it in front of you.
  2. Consciously execute – You may choose to do it daily or every other day.  Whatever the case, don’t miss opportunities to put into practice the new habit.
  3.  Keep it simple – If you’re not a runner don’t expect to run a marathon after a month of practice.  Start small and work your way up.
  4. Be consistent – When you practice your habit do it the same way all the time (and make sure you do it correctly all the time.)
  5. Have an accountability partner – They may not practice the habit with you but will encourage you when you succeed or if you slip up a bit.
  6. Bonus Tip- Don’t beat yourself up if you slip.  If you get off the wagon, dust yourself off and get back on.

Look to create good habits this year.  And take some time to see if those around you could use a partner to help them develop good habits, too.

Hosted by University Laboratory Animal Resources, University of Pennsylvania

RSVP Here

  • Educational Seminars on Transgenic Technology and Rodent Breeding
  • Formal Vendor 15min Presentations
  • Complimentary Lunch
  • Vendor Fair

When: Tuesday, August 9th, 2011 @ 9am-4pm. Registration check-in at 8:30am

Where: University of Pennsylvania - Bio-medical Research Building (BRB) II/III, 421 Curie Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Cost: Free!

Session Topics:

Mouse Tales: Introduction to Mouse Breeding and Colony Management

More Tails from the Crypt: Advance Mouse Colony Management

Cryopreservation, Genotyping, and more!

Interested in participating as a vendor? Register Here

Questions? Contact William Singleton at William@ACTStraining.com

Sometimes the most effective leaders within an organization are among the biggest personnel problem an organization faces.  This is too often true because the formal leadership within an organization does not fully comprehend who all of its leaders are.  While organizations try to tap into and nurture individuals that “they” feel possess natural leadership skills, they often fail to recognize an equally important layer of leadership that carries as much, if not more, importance in realizing the highest level of performance the group is capable of achieving.  Informal leaders can be found within most organization and as stated they may be one of your greatest challenges or conversely they may be one of your greatest assets.   Failing to ignore that optimum performance from any group can seldom be obtained if formal leaders do not recognize who fills the informal leadership roles within the various layers of its organization.

Who are informal leaders?  Informal leaders are those individuals within the organization that have been “elected” by their peers to lead and set performance standards.  Typically informal leaders are not titled and if they are, they would be considered low level management.  We have previously defined leadership as being the ability to influence.  Our ability to influence others has also been confirmed to not be necessarily be associated with possessing a title or degree.  So who are your informal leaders?  Maybe it is that employee that comes in on a Monday morning with a great attitude and all the staff follow suit.  Perhaps it’s the same tech that comes into work in a foul mood and the entire group has to tip toe around them to the point of suppressing their joy or contentment for fear of retaliation from this tech.  The informal leaders have the ability to improve the overall performance of the group or to derail productivity.  As leaders it is critical that we take the time to identify these individuals and work with them to the point where they are on board with company policies, practices and vision.  Encouragement and periodic reward for their services to the group is essential.

Note:  Informal leaders don’t necessarily need to be promoted; just recognized and appreciated.

It is the effective management of informal leaders that allows formal leaders to assure the performance of the collective group is moving in the direction of an organization’s goals.  Good informal leaders can help make your organization be a better place to work.